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Enloe Magnet High School (2018)

Raleigh, NC

School Counseling Core Curriculum Results Report

REVISED
The data we received from our bullying, report card check-in and senior orientation lessons will help our department adjust the content and delivery of these lessons for 2017-18. Overall, the data suggested our students understood what we presented in terms of expectations for behavior, academic and attendance outcomes, which tied in with our program goals for the 2016-17 school year.

Each of these lessons was delivered to students in the Future Ready Core course of study (not students in the Occupational Course of Study or Self-Contained course of study). Students’ attainment of knowledge was evaluated via post survey results (See uploaded data charts). Post-test results for the senior orientation lesson showed significant growth in correctly answered questions. We have greatly improved our use of perception data via pre/post surveys and use of data charts to help illustrate growth from pre to post tests. Data suggests we may need to review the information regarding questions 2 & 3 (regarding the minimum GPA for the UNC system schools and the elective concentration needed for graduation) in the orientation lesson to help increase understanding. The same questions were asked of 9th-graders on the pre/post-test for the report-card check-in lesson, and again the responses to both of these questions revealed fewer students understood the correct information than the response to question one (which asks students about the required number of credits for their respective grade).

In terms of the post-assessment for the bullying lesson, the significance of the data lies in the percentages: about 11% of 684 students said reporting bullying would make it worse. Although it is good that 89% did not believe reporting bullying to an adult would make it worse, the fact that even 11% believe this provides an implication for the department to pursue (challenging that belief) when presenting the lesson in the 2017-18 school year. This is important because of one of the stated behaviors for this lesson (SS 8) was for students to “demonstrate advocacy skills and ability to assert self, when necessary.” In order to do so, students at risk of being bullied have to believe there’s a value in reporting it. Our bullying lesson was given to our Health and Physical Education classes which is comprised mostly of 9th grade students, however, there are students from all grades levels represented. Our outcome data for bullying incidents is representative for the entire school during the 2015-2016 and 2016-2017 school years. It should also be noted that these reported incidents of bullying may not be accurate. In order for a bullying incident to be recorded to have such data, it is up to the Administrators to provide in the discipline system that bullying was one of the reported behaviors. We believe that there may be more cases of bullying but the actual indication of this number may not be recorded accurately by teachers submitted referrals and Administrators completing their necessary paperwork. Unfortunately, this documentation is out of our control.

For the senior orientation lesson, the data suggests seniors know most requirements for graduation (part of lesson behavior LS 7: identify long and short-term academic, career and social/emotional goals). Even the question with the least amount of answers, number 3 which discussed the elective concentration requirement, was correctly answered by more than 78 percent of seniors. That data does suggest, though, that counselors and students would stand to benefit from discussing that requirement more thoroughly during the individual senior meetings counselors have in the first quarter.

For the report card check-in lesson, the pre-test and post-test data show a big jump in the percentage of 9th-graders who correctly reported the number of credits they need to graduate (pre-test, 54.3%, post-test, 82.8%). This is particularly important because the school’s transition to an A/B schedule meant 9th-graders need 4 more credits to graduate than the 12th-graders did, so the earlier they understand the requirement, the better. Still, the fact that about 18 percent of 9th-graders still did not know how many credits they needed suggests an area to emphasize both in this year’s 10th-grade sessions (for those who didn’t get it the first time) and this year’s 9th-grade sessions. Understanding these requirements could have an impact on lesson mindset M2 (self-confidence in ability to succeed).

Grade Level: 9

Lesson Topic: Bullying

Lesson was Presented in Which Class/Subject:

ASCA Domain, Mindsets & Behaviors Standard(s): Mindsets 2: Self-confidence in ability to succeed; Behavior -- S-MS 7, Demonstrate effective coping skills when faced with a problem S-MS 9 9. Demonstrate personal safety skills Behavior -- SS 8. Demonstrate advocacy skills and ability to assert self, when necessary

Start/End: October 10-27, 2017

Process Data (Number of students affected): 684

Perception Data (Surveys or assessments used): REVISED
Per the post survey: 51.3% students said yes, they could name the four categories of bullying; 79.5% said they knew what a bystander was; 67.9% said that all forms of bullying came down to one person trying to gain power over another one; 77.1% agreed that spreading rumors was another form of bullying; 10% felt that reporting bullying would make it worse; 73.8% said they knew Enloe's bullying reporting process.

Outcome Data (Achievement, attendance, and/or behavior data): Enloe's bullying incidents for: 2016-2017 __3____. 2015-2016 __13____.

Implications: REVISED The data suggests presenters still need to work to help students understand the importance of reporting bullying. Even though the percentage of those who thought reporting would make bullying worse was 10%, that's still a large enough percentage for concern.

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Grade Level: 12

Lesson Topic: Senior Orientation

Lesson was Presented in Which Class/Subject:

ASCA Domain, Mindsets & Behaviors Standard(s): M4: Understanding that postsecondary education and lifelong learning are necessary for long-term career success. B-LS 7: Identify long-and short-term academic, career and social/emotional goals. B-LS 1: Demonstrate critical-thinking skills to make informed decisions.

Start/End: Sept. 12-14, 2016

Process Data (Number of students affected): 513

Perception Data (Surveys or assessments used): REVISED
For question 1, the number of correct answers increased from 67.92 to 85.01%/ Question 2, an increase in accuracy from 66.67% to 88.45%; questions 3 increase from 62.406% to 78.13% and on question 4, 87.97% of seniors said they planned to attend a 2yr or 4yr college on the pre-test.

Outcome Data (Achievement, attendance, and/or behavior data): Graduation rate as of August 2017: 90.6% 2016 graduation rate: 89.0% 2015 graduation rate: 81.6%

Implications: The data implies that by senior year a significant number of seniors do understand their graduation credit requirements and have a post-secondary plan. This is further supported by the senior survey data results where 92% of seniors reported their plan. Our graduation rate continues to improve and we are moving closer towards the district's goal to graduate 95% of students by the year 2020.

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Grade Level: 9

Lesson Topic: Report Card Check-In

Lesson was Presented in Which Class/Subject:

ASCA Domain, Mindsets & Behaviors Standard(s): M2 Self-confidence in ability to succeed; B-LS3 Use time-management, organizational and study skills; B-LS4 Apply self-motivation and self-direction to learning; B-SMS 1 Demonstrate ability to assume responsibility

Start/End: Nov. 9-10, 2016

Process Data (Number of students affected): 608

Perception Data (Surveys or assessments used): Per the 2016 post-test 82.8% knew the required grad. Credits, 71.25% Question 2 correct
Q3 67.5% correct
86.8% said they knew their learning style after the lesson; 82.678% felt comfortable asking a teacher for help.

Outcome Data (Achievement, attendance, and/or behavior data): First-time 9th promotion rate was 90.5%. The 2016-2017 quarterly Passing rates, 5 of 8 classes: Quarter 1: 91% Quarter 2: 85% (At the beginning of the 2015-2016 school year there were 101 retained ninth graders. This number includes 19 students who were previously retained from the 2014-2015 school year. By the end of the 2015-2016 school year 43 of the 101 retained ninth graders were promoted, which is 42.57%. However, 35 of the original 101 retained were no longer listed in power school by the end of the 2015-2016 school year for reasons that included: withdrawal and transferring out to other schools during the school year).

Implications: The data implies that the additional measures taken in our action plan for ninth graders, which included the report-card check-in lesson with ninth graders and the new grad point objective recovery opportunity, contributed to the 90.5% promotion rate. The rate was only slightly lower than the intended goal of 92%. Although our ninth grade action plan included the orientation lesson combined with report-card check-in, which showed students how to calculate their grade point averages, as well as career information, assistance with course registration, and lessons regarding personal/social concerns (S.O.S. and Human Trafficking), we may need to review our action plan for ninth grade for the 2017-18 school year to determine best ways to continue to support ninth graders as to improve their promotion rate.

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