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Southern Elementary School (2017)

Falmouth, KY

Academic Achievement
Group Counseling

School Counseling Core Curriculum Results Report

At SES, process, perception, and outcome data were collected and analyzed to evaluate the effectiveness of the school counseling core curriculum. The School Counseling Core Curriculum interventions targeted math and reading goals for fourth and fifth grade. These goals were to deliver Student Success Skills (SSS) classroom guidance interventions to increase their Math MAP scores by 5% and Reading MAP scores by 4% by the Spring 2016 Spring Math and Reading MAP assessment. After evaluating the data, we found out that we have met our fourth grade math and reading goal and fifth grade-reading goal, but did not meet our fifth grade math goal.

Three lessons from the Student Success Skills (SSS) curriculum was chosen to capture the main ideas of five SSS lessons delivered in the classroom. These lessons focus on building a caring, supporting, and encouraging classroom community, to teach optimism and strategies important for student success, and improve their self-management, cognitive, and social skills. Students learn about the seven keys to mastering any course and learn to monitor their progress, while also sharing success stories in the classroom. The lessons cover several important topics in one session and are reinforced in all the sessions to increase memory, thus increasing the impact of the lessons and fulfilling multiple ASCA Mindsets and Behaviors (see lesson plans).

All 100 fifth grade students received SSS classroom guidance lessons (process data). Each session took 30 minutes once a week for five weeks. Booster sessions were delivered once a month throughout the spring. The first lesson was delivered on October 23, 2015 and continued through December 18, 2015. Each student completed a 25-question survey (Student Engagement in School Success Survey (SESSS)) prior to beginning the curriculum and completed the same survey after delivery of Student Success Skills booster lessons. Only 97 completed the pre and post assessments due to student transfers. The average mean for the 5th pre-test was 3.13 and the average mean for the post-test was 3.22. This is an increase of .09 points, which is a 2.88% increase. The sum of the pre-test was 78.2 and the sum of the post-test was 80.52. This is a 2.32 point increase, which was not statistically significant (see attached: Perception Data - SESSS Visuals).

Since the Student Success Skills lessons teach students’ academic, social, and self-management skills to improve performance, Fall and Spring Reading MAP Data were analyzed. The average 5th grade Fall MAP reading score was 203.96 and the average Spring score was 212.93. This was an increase of 8.97 points which shows s a 4.4 % increase. The average 5th grade Fall MAP math score was 210.05 and the average Spring score was 216.53. This was an increase of 6.48 points which shows s a 3.08 % increase (see attached: Outcome Data - Core Curriculum Results).

The Reading goal of improving by 4% was achieved. The Math goal of improving by 5% was not achieved. However, the relationship between the school counseling intervention and the increases in MAP scores is not clear due to the lack of significant growth between the pre-and-post assessments. The lack of growth between the pre-and-post assessments captures the minimal impact of the SSS intervention. Numerous explanations could account for the lack of impact. For example, one teacher implemented the intervention with support from the school counselor to all students in the fifth grade. The school counselor did not implement the intervention across the four classes in the fifth grade. When the students returned to other classrooms after receiving the intervention from one teacher, the tenets and constructs of the intervention were not reinforced in-between lessons.

Further, the fidelity of the intervention was not maintained during implementation. Therefore, the effectiveness of the intervention was lessened. In the future, the intervention could be co-delivered by a teacher and the school counselor and booster lessons could be provided throughout the year. In addition, the delivery of the intervention was not consistent. For instance, lesson three was delivered on November 06, 2015; however lesson four may have been delivered two or three weeks later due to factors beyond our control. In addition, increased teacher support and training may help future implementation of the program, since buy-in is still a big factor in delivering the SSS program. The school counselors can support the teacher by brainstorming creative ideas to keep the lessons and activities engaging and more effective for the class.

Grade Level: 5

Lesson Topic: Student Success Skills Lesson 1

Lesson was Presented in Which Class/Subject:

ASCA Domain, Mindsets & Behaviors Standard(s): C1,M2: Self-confidence in ability to succeed C1,M3: Sense of belonging in the school environment C1,M5: Belief in using abilities to their fullest to achieve high-quality results and outcomes C1,M6: Positive attitude toward work and learning C2,LS3: Use time-management, organizational and study skills C2,LS4: Apply self-motivation and self-direction to learning C2,LS7: Identify long- and short-term academic, career and social/emotional goals C2,SMS7: Demonstrate effective coping skills when faced with a problem C2,SS2: Create positive and supportive relationships with other students.

Start/End: 10/23/2015

Process Data (Number of students affected): 100 total students received the intervention; 97 completed the Student Engagement in School Success Survey (SESSS) before and after the intervention

Perception Data (Surveys or assessments used): The average mean for the 5th pre-test (SESSS) was 3.13 and the average mean for the post-test was 3.22. This is an increase of .09 points, which is a 2.88% increase. The sum of the pre-test was 78.2 and the sum of the post-test was 80.52. This is a 2.32 point increase and is not significant.(See attached: Perception Data - SESSS Visuals).

Outcome Data (Achievement, attendance, and/or behavior data): he average 5th grade Fall MAP reading score was 203.96 and the average 5th grade MAP reading score in the Spring was 212.93. This was an increase of 8.97 points which shows s a 4.4 % increase. The average 5th grade Fall MAP math score was 210.05 and the average 5th grade MAP math score in the Spring was 216.53 This was an increase of 6.48 points which shows s a 3.08 % increase. (See attached: Outcome Data - Core Curriculum Results)

Implications: The Reading goal of improving by 4% was achieved. The Math goal of improving by 5% was not achieved. However, the relationship between the school counseling intervention and the increases in MAP scores is not clear due to the lack of significant growth between the pre-and-post assessments. The lack of growth between the pre-and-post assessments captures the minimal impact of the SSS intervention. Numerous explanations could account for the lack of impact. For example, one teacher implemented the intervention with support from the school counselor. The school counselor did not implement the intervention across the four classes in the Fifth Grade. When the students returned to other classrooms after receiving the intervention from one teacher, the tenets and constructs of the intervention were not reinforced in-between lessons. Further, the fidelity of the intervention was not maintained during implementation. Therefore, the effectiveness of the intervention was lessened. In the future, the intervention could be co-delivered by a teacher and the school counselor and the school counselor could work with other teachers in the Fifth Grade to reinforce the tenets and constructs of the lesson across classes.

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Grade Level: 5

Lesson Topic: Student Success Skills Lesson 2

Lesson was Presented in Which Class/Subject:

ASCA Domain, Mindsets & Behaviors Standard(s): C1,M2: Self-confidence in ability to succeed C1,M3: Sense of belonging in the school environment C1,M5: Belief in using abilities to their fullest to achieve high-quality results and outcomes C1,M6: Positive attitude toward work and learning C2,LS3: Use time-management, organizational and study skills C2,LS4: Apply self-motivation and self-direction to learning C2,LS7: Identify long- and short-term academic, career and social/emotional goals C2,SMS7: Demonstrate effective coping skills when faced with a problem C2,SS2: Create positive and supportive relationships with other students

Start/End: 10/29/2015

Process Data (Number of students affected): 100 total students received the intervention; 97 completed the Student Engagement in School Success Survey (SESSS) before and after the intervention.

Perception Data (Surveys or assessments used): The average mean for the 5th pre-test (SESSS) was 3.13 and the average mean for the post-test was 3.22. This is an increase of .09 points, which is a 2.88% increase. The sum of the pre-test was 78.2 and the sum of the post-test was 80.52. This is a 2.32 point increase and is not significant.(See attached: Perception Data - SESSS Visuals).

Outcome Data (Achievement, attendance, and/or behavior data): The average 5th grade Fall MAP reading score was 203.96 and the average 5th grade MAP reading score in the Spring was 212.93. This was an increase of 8.97 points which shows s a 4.4 % increase. The average 5th grade Fall MAP math score was 210.05 and the average 5th grade MAP math score in the Spring was 216.53 This was an increase of 6.48 points which shows s a 3.08 % increase. (See attached: Outcome Data - Core Curriculum Results)

Implications: The Reading goal of improving by 4% was achieved. The Math goal of improving by 5% was not achieved. However, the relationship between the school counseling intervention and the increases in MAP scores is not clear due to the lack of significant growth between the pre-and-post assessment. The lack of growth between the pre-and-post assessments captures the minimal impact of the SSS intervention. Numerous explanations could account for the lack of impact. For example, one teacher implemented the intervention with support from the school counselor. The school counselor did not implement the intervention across the four classes in the Fifth Grade. When the students returned to other classrooms after receiving the intervention from one teacher, the tenets and constructs of the intervention were not reinforced in-between lessons. Further, the fidelity of the intervention was not maintained during implementation. Therefore, the effectiveness of the intervention was lessened. In the future, the intervention could be co-delivered by a teacher and the school counselor and the school counselor could work with other teachers in the Fifth Grade to reinforce the tenets and constructs of the lesson across classes.

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Grade Level: 5

Lesson Topic: Student Success Skills Lesson 3

Lesson was Presented in Which Class/Subject:

ASCA Domain, Mindsets & Behaviors Standard(s):

Start/End: 11/6/2015

Process Data (Number of students affected): 100 total students received the intervention; 97 completed the Student Engagement in School Success Survey (SESSS) before and after the intervention.

Perception Data (Surveys or assessments used): The average mean for the 5th pre-test (SESSS) was 3.13 and the average mean for the post-test was 3.22. This is an increase of .09 points, which is a 2.88% increase. The sum of the pre-test was 78.2 and the sum of the post-test was 80.52. This is a 2.32 point increase and is not significant.(See attached: Perception Data - SESSS Visuals).

Outcome Data (Achievement, attendance, and/or behavior data): The average 5th grade Fall MAP reading score was 203.96 and the average 5th grade MAP reading score in the Spring was 212.93. This was an increase of 8.97 points which shows s a 4.4 % increase. The average 5th grade Fall MAP math score was 210.05 and the average 5th grade MAP math score in the Spring was 216.53 This was an increase of 6.48 points which shows s a 3.08 % increase. (See attached: Outcome Data - Core Curriculum Results)

Implications: The Reading goal of improving by 4% was achieved. The Math goal of improving by 5% was not achieved. However, the relationship between the school counseling intervention and the increases in MAP scores is not clear due to the lack of significant growth between the pre-and-post assessment. The lack of growth between the pre-and-post assessments captures the minimal impact of the SSS intervention. Numerous explanations could account for the lack of impact. For example, one teacher implemented the intervention with support from the school counselor. The school counselor did not implement the intervention across the four classes in the Fifth Grade. When the students returned to other classrooms after receiving the intervention from one teacher, the tenets and constructs of the intervention were not reinforced in-between lessons. Further, the fidelity of the intervention was not maintained during implementation. Therefore, the effectiveness of the intervention was lessened. In the future, the intervention could be co-delivered by a teacher and the school counselor and the school counselor could work with other teachers in the Fifth Grade to reinforce the tenets and constructs of the lesson across classes.

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