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Lanier Middle School (2018)

Sugar Hill, GA

School Counseling Core Curriculum Results Report

REVISED:
Response to feedback: Though we understand the importance of pre-post assessments for core curriculum, we chose to take turns administering them to each grade level. Ms. Auslin collected pre-post data regarding bullying, Mrs. Diaz collected pre-post regarding study skills and Mrs. Hyman collected pre-post data on attendance. Because we were already collecting school wide perception data regarding bullying through our needs assessment, we felt this approach was sufficient regarding this section. As a counseling team, we designed the needs assessment in conjunction with developing our bullying lessons. Questions in the needs assessment were specifically addressed in grade level lessons. As a needs assessment is a valid form of perception data, we were confident in our data collection.

REVISED Narrative: An analysis of the school counseling core curriculum results report allowed our department to determine the effectiveness of our programs and core curriculum lessons. As well, it provided data necessary to make informed decisions about lessons, small groups, and interventions we would continue using the following year and focused our conversations on program adjustments needed. According to the data collected, we believe the core curriculum results report reflects improvement, as evidenced by our school’s academic, attendance, and discipline referral data.

The data obtained from core curriculum lessons on bullying prevention indicate favorable perception data, and demonstrate the lessons share valuable information about bullying and understanding empathy. The needs assessment directly asked students about their overall experiences at school, the impact they have had on their peers and how they have been impacted by others, and whether they have been bullied or witnessed bullying behavior at school, among many other questions. After reviewing the results, we were encouraged by the number of students who answered positively. However, it did give us some cause to pause and reflect on what students’ responses truly meant and the implications: 1) Could it be, because we are school counselors, we have a biased view of the prevalence of bullying at our school given our close ties to its prevention? 2) Could it be, students responded more favorably because they only responded how they “knew” they should? 3) Could it be, our school really doesn’t have a bullying problem and most of our students treat each other kindly most of the time? Most likely, all three explanations are plausible.

The counselors truly believe our bullying prevention efforts had a positive impact on LMS. After our lessons, students demonstrated a greater understanding of the importance of using assertiveness skills, the differences between bullying/conflict and empathy/sympathy. They demonstrated this through increased use of the language and vocabulary covered in the lessons as well as their ownership of treatment toward their peers and staff. Teachers reported to us that students were increasingly talking about LMS being a ‘No Place For Hate’ school and taking ownership of the school climate.
Additionally, we developed an online Anonymous Bully Report, linked to the school and counseling department websites and introduced it to students during bullying lessons. This tool allows students to feel safer in reporting bullying situations. There were only a few reports submitted during the 16-17 school year, therefore we did not report this as outcome data. We attribute this to students’ increased level of comfort with talking face-to-face with their grade level counselor. Students that utilized the reporting tool, expressed to us appreciation for having this option.

While outcome data revealed improvement in school attendance and academics (GMAS Assessment), discipline referral data did not indicate a favorable outcome. Despite efforts to increase pro-social behavior, discipline data showed an increase in discipline referrals from 2015-2016 to 2016-2017. We believe the increase can be attributed to restructuring in administrative duties and responsibilities. In 2015-2016, LMS had only one assistant principal responsible for the school’s discipline. When our principal restructured the administrative team, he assigned grade level discipline to the respective grade level Assistant Principal. After this administrative shift, teachers conveyed our school’s discipline process was more streamlined and efficiently managed, and grade level administrators were more responsive to student discipline concerns. As a result, teachers were more willing to write discipline referrals for rule violations and engaging in disruptive behavior. Because teachers felt more supported by administration, we believe more referrals were written as a result.

The school counseling core curriculum results report provided an opportunity for counselors to reflect on the process, outcome, and perception data gathered last year, equipping counselors with critical information needed to modify core curriculum lesson delivery and content, making necessary adjustments to support program improvement.

Grade Level: 6

Lesson Topic: Bullying/Conflict Resolution

Lesson was Presented in Which Class/Subject:

ASCA Domain, Mindsets & Behaviors Standard(s): M3, B-LS9, B-SMS7, B-SS8

Start/End: October

Process Data (Number of students affected): 468

Perception Data (Surveys or assessments used): School-wide climate needs assessment administered after all bullying lessons were conducted. We plan to compare year to year results. Results from individual items are as follows:
• 87% of students feel extremely/somewhat comfortable standing up for something they believe in
• 78% of students feel extremely/somewhat comfortable intervening when they someone being treated badly
• 87% of students feel strongly/somewhat agree that if they need help with a problem, they know an adult at school to help them
• 92% of students feel they are able to have different likes, dislikes, and other friends from whom they usually hang out with at school
• 72% strongly/somewhat agree that if they hear a joke about someone’s race, religion, or appearance, they have a strategy to address it
•67 % strongly/somewhat agree that they can identify situation in which they had been a bystander, and 34% of students agree/disagree or somewhat/strongly disagree they could identify a situation in which they had been a bystander.
•93% strongly/somewhat agree they know that difference between fun teasing/roasting and malicious teasing/roasting.
•95% strongly/somewhat agree they understand the kinds of gossip that can be hurtful
•63% of students strongly/somewhat agree their social media profiles reflect their real and true selves
•70% strongly/somewhat agree that boys can be sexually harassed
•93% strongly/somewhat agree it is important to understand how race, gender, and ethnicity can impact the way people treat one another
•84% strongly/somewhat agree they understand the impact social media can have on the way I see others
•40% strongly/somewhat agree they feel pressure to maintain a certain image on their social media profiles
•The three places students have seen/experienced bullying the MOST are 1. Hallway (53%), 2) Restroom (38%), Stairwell (36%)
• 10% of students have been hit or physically hurt in a bullying situation at LMS
•33% of students report being teased in an unfriendly way at LMS
• 25% of students report being excluded from a group or purpose at LMS
• 24% of students report having an unkind or hurtful rumor spread about them this year at LMS
• 11% of students report they have had someone at LMS post something unkind about them on social media
• 12% of students report they have had someone from LMS text or group text something unkind or hurtful about me
• 78% of students feel like they belong at LMS

Outcome Data (Achievement, attendance, and/or behavior data): GA Milestones test data show a school wide improvement in the amount of students scoring in the "Proficient" and "Distinguished Learner" categories in the areas of Math (53% to 56%)and Social Studies (60% to 61%)and a reduction in Science (54% to 42%) and English/Language Arts (59% to 57%). Discipline referral data shows an increase in the amount of referrals written (469 in 2015-2016 to 478 in 2016-2017). Attendance data showed a 14.6% improvement in the amount of students that missed six or more days. See attached School-wide Outcome Data Powerpoint.

Implications: Students were engaged during this lesson and reacted strongly to the video regarding bullying. Discussion with the classes showed that most students did not realize that GA has a law about bullying in school and that they have a right to expect support from school staf f and administration if they feel they are being bullied. Students had a lot to say about their perception of the differences between mean behaviors and actual bullying showing the discrepancies in accepted community definitions of bullying. However, it was clear that the portion of the lesson they enjoyed the most was the role playing of the Em-Power Tools. This year, I plan to teach the same lesson but find a way to split it into a two-part lesson to give students more time to practice the 'tools'. After this lesson, I noticed an increase in the amount of students coming to my office to discuss bullying and conflicts. This could have been influenced by the fact that they were getting to know me better as the year was progressing, but I also feel that the lesson contributed to them understanding when it may be time to seek adult help during conflicts with classmates.

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Grade Level: 7

Lesson Topic: Bullying

Lesson was Presented in Which Class/Subject:

ASCA Domain, Mindsets & Behaviors Standard(s): M3, B-SS 2, B-SS 4, B-SS 8

Start/End: October31/November 4

Process Data (Number of students affected): 507

Perception Data (Surveys or assessments used): Pre/post test (dichotomous format) showed a 33% improvement in scores demonstrating an increased understanding of concepts presented during the lesson.
School-wide climate needs assessment administered after all bullying lessons were conducted. We plan to compare year to year results. Results from individual items are as follows:
• 87% of students feel extremely/
somewhat comfortable standing up for something they believe in
• 78% of students feel extremely/
somewhat comfortable intervening when they someone being treated badly
• 87% of students feel strongly/
somewhat agree that if they need help with a problem, they know an adult at school to help them
• 92% of students feel they are able to have different likes, dislikes, and other friends from whom they usually hang out with at school
• 72% strongly/somewhat agree that if they hear a joke about someone’s race, religion, or appearance, they have a strategy to address it
•67 % strongly/somewhat agree that they can identify situation in which they had been a bystander, and 34% of students agree/disagree or somewhat/strongly disagree they could identify a situation in which they had been a bystander.
•93% strongly/somewhat agree they know that difference between fun teasing/roasting and malicious teasing/roasting.
•95% strongly/somewhat agree they understand the kinds of gossip that can be hurtful
•63% of students strongly/somewhat agree their social media profiles reflect their real and true selves
•70% strongly/somewhat agree that boys can be sexually harassed
•93% strongly/somewhat agree it is important to understand how race, gender, and ethnicity can impact the way people treat one another
•84% strongly/somewhat agree they understand the impact social media can have on the way I see others
•40% strongly/somewhat agree they feel pressure to maintain a certain image on their social media profiles
•The three places students have seen/experienced bullying the MOST are 1. Hallway (53%), 2) Restroom (38%), Stairwell (36%)
• 10% of students have been hit or physically hurt in a bullying situation at LMS
•33% of students report being teased in an unfriendly way at LMS
• 25% of students report being excluded from a group or purpose at LMS
• 24% of students report having an unkind or hurtful rumor spread about them this year at LMS
• 11% of students report they have had someone at LMS post something unkind about them on social media
• 12% of students report they have had someone from LMS text or group text something unkind or hurtful about me
• 78% of students feel like they belong at
LMS

Data from pre/post test shows an improvement in student comprehension of concepts covered during lesson.
School-wide climate needs assessment administered after all bullying lessons were conducted. (see document attached). We plan to compare year to year results.

Outcome Data (Achievement, attendance, and/or behavior data): GA Milestones test data show a school wide improvement in the amount of students scoring in the "Proficient" and "Distinguished Learner" categories in the areas of Math (53% to 56%)and Social Studies (60% to 61%)and a reduction in Science (54% to 42%) and English/Language Arts (59% to 57%). Discipline referral data shows an increase in the amount of referrals written (469 in 2015-2016 to 478 in 2016-2017). Attendance data showed a 14.6% improvement in the amount of students that missed six or more days. See attached School-wide Outcome Data Powerpoint.

Implications: Research shows that teaching empathy can help students improve academically and improve their abilities to become better students. By continuing to spread kindness through the Great Kindness Challenge, No Place for Hate, and other Anti-Bullying Prevention initiatives, students were reminded of the importance of maintaining empathetic and not engaging in bullying-related behaviors. I felt as though this was an effective lesson where students were able to learn different ways of being empathetic, how to implement those skills into their every day lives, and the importance of being kind and supportive to peers. I plan on using this lesson for the upcoming year.

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Grade Level: 8

Lesson Topic: Bullying

Lesson was Presented in Which Class/Subject:

ASCA Domain, Mindsets & Behaviors Standard(s): M3, B-SS 2

Start/End: October/November

Process Data (Number of students affected): 435

Perception Data (Surveys or assessments used): School-wide climate needs assessment administered after all bullying lessons were conducted. (see document attached). We plan to compare year to year results.
Results from individual items are as follows:
• 87% of students feelextremely/
somewhat comfortable standing up for something they believe in
• 78% of students feel extremely/
somewhat comfortable intervening when they someone being treated badly
• 87% of students feel strongly/somewhat agree that if they need help with a problem, they know an adult at school to help them
• 92% of students feel they are able to have different likes, dislikes, and other friends from whom they usually hang out with at school
• 72% strongly/somewhat agree that if they hear a joke about someone’s race, religion, or appearance, they have a strategy to address it
•67 % strongly/somewhat agree that they can identify situation in which they had been a bystander;

34% of students agree/disagree or somewhat/strongly disagree they could identify a situation in which they had been a bystander.
•93% strongly/somewhat agree they know that difference between fun teasing/roasting and malicious teasing/roasting.
•95% strongly/somewhat agree they understand the kinds of gossip that can be hurtful
•63% of students strongly/somewhat agree their social media profiles reflect their real and true selves
•70% strongly/somewhat agree that boys can be sexually harassed
•93% strongly/somewhat agree it is important to understand how race, gender, and ethnicity can impact the way people treat one another
•84% strongly/somewhat agree they understand the impact social media can have on the way I see others
•40% strongly/somewhat agree they feel pressure to maintain a certain image on their social media profiles
•The three places students have seen/experienced bullying the MOST are 1. Hallway (53%), 2) Restroom (38%), Stairwell (36%)
• 10% of students have been hit or physically hurt in a bullying situation at LMS
•33% of students report being teased in an unfriendly way at LMS
• 25% of students report being excluded from a group or purpose at LMS
• 24% of students report having an unkind or hurtful rumor spread about them this year at LMS
• 11% of students report they have had someone at LMS post something unkind about them on social media
• 12% of students report they have had someone from LMS text or group text something unkind or hurtful about me
• 78% of students feel like they belong at LMS

Outcome Data (Achievement, attendance, and/or behavior data): GA Milestones test data show a school wide improvement in the amount of students scoring in the "Proficient" and "Distinguished Learner" categories in the areas of Math (53% to 56%)and Social Studies (60% to 61%)and a reduction in Science (54% to 42%) and English/Language Arts (59% to 57%). Discipline referral data shows an increase in the amount of referrals written (469 in 2015-2016 to 478 in 2016-2017). Attendance data showed a 14.6% improvement in the amount of students that missed six or more days. See attached School-wide Outcome Data Powerpoint.

Implications: Students were highly engaged in the lesson and participated in constructive dialogue about perceptions and prevalence of bullying, as well as the overall climate of Lanier Middle School. In the future, I may modify the lesson by eliminating the power point presentation and incorporating the main points into the overall discussion. I recognize trying to squeeze too much into the lesson, takes time away from discussion and allows more opportunity to process with students. The LMS Counseling Department plans to implement school-wide, preventive anti-bullying initiatives, including No Place for Hate and Great Kindness Challenge, as a way to build upon and extend the counseling core curriculum bullying/cyber-bullying lesson. Additionally, Peer Leaders will remain highly visible on campus, serving as allies for classmates and ambassadors for all anti-bullying initiatives, and will promote kindness and empathy throughout the remainder of the year.

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